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Resin Casting

Thu Apr 30, 2015, 3:00 PM by Xadrea:iconxadrea:
:iconprojecteducate:
:iconprojecteducate:


Artist's Toolbox Week

Using resin in your artwork


Hey guys! I’ve been wanting to write a tutorial on resin casting/pouring for a bit now (and I promise one is in the works!), but in the meanwhile, I think it would be good to explain what epoxy resin is, safety concerns, and of course, how AWESOME it is!

I started using epoxy resin in my paintings almost two years ago after being introduced to the resin paintings of Bruce Riley during ArtPrize 2013. I was initially drawn to finding a way to achieve visual depth on a 2 dimensional surface. Now, of course it is more than possible to depict spatial depth by using perspective, but my paintings aren’t trying to depict a realistic sense of perspective. Rather, I wanted to find a way to layer color and patterns in a shallow space and doing so without overwhelming the image. The only way to achieve that would to be somehow work in multiple layers, and thus resin was the answer! Most recently, I’ve started casting bracelets with my left over resin and I plan on casting even more stuffs as time goes on!

What is this stuff?


So, what is this epoxy resin that I speak of? Epoxy resins are a pre-polymer, which is science for “mixed with the right stuff, this thing’s molecules will link up and get larger and denser.” And that means harder. Most commercial resins are a two-part mix, one part being the resin; the other part is the hardener. The resin requires the hardener in order to harden up. It can be used to protect surfaces, as a glue, or even to cast objects in molds. 2015-02-06 16.17.08 by Xadrea

Is it toxic?


Is it dangerous? Yes and no. While resin isn’t toxic, you can’t bathe in it, eat it, or huff it :XD: In it’s liquid state resin can irritate your skin and give off smelly odors. In it’s hardened state it’s no longer hazardous, unless you decide you’d like to sand/file it because you’d be getting plastic dust in the air (and potentially in your lungs).  There, there, I’m not trying to scare you so get out from under your desk! I’m just giving you the rundown! In my opinion, working with resin in your artwork is no more dangerous than working with oil paint (some of which are toxic).  All art making materials can be dangerous in the right situation, so it’s important to know how to handle them to avoid accidents and health issues down the road.

How do you use it?


I’m pretty good at eyeballing my measurements of the two-part mix, but if you’re just starting off it would be in your best interest to use mini measuring cups. If you don’t measure both parts equally your resin will never fully harden, rather it will stay tacky and unusable. You’ll also need a well-ventilated work area and a level surface. Resin cures in warm environments best, so working in a drafty studio or your garage on a cold day isn’t optimal. I use a silicone mat to protect my table from any drips that might happen, but old paper can do the trick as well. Protect your workstation because resin is permanent. Ok, well that’s not entirely true…it can be melted with other chemicals, but trust me, you don’t want to have to do that. Lastly, if you have a heat gun or blow dryer, bring it along! Both can help you get air bubbles out after you pour it onto whatever surface or mold you’re working with.
2015-02-06 16.16.24 by Xadrea


After you combine the two equal parts of resin, mix them until the liquid is smooth looking. Try to do so smoothly so you don’t get a ton of bubbles. Large ones will pop on their own but the teeny ones will try to stick around and you probably don’t want them. Pay attention to the time. Typically, you’ve got a 30 minute working time before the resin begins to stiffen up, but if your workspace is toasty that time frame will shrink faster. Try to spend no more than 10 minutes mixing. Before you pour your resin, make certain that your surface is oil free, hair free, and level. Since I pour my resin on a surface with no raised edges, I use masking tape to give it a border to run up to. I didn’t do this in the past and I had resin dripping and running everywhere! After I’ve poured my resin, I like to spread it evenly with a painting knife or wooden stirring stick to ensure equal coverage.

What is Cure time?


The cure time for your resin greatly depends on the brand you buy. I’ve found with the kinds I buy 36 hours is the general cure time. If you’re planning on making jewelry (like the bracelets I’ve been making) you’ll really need to pay attention to the cure time because you will be pouring the resin in layers. If you do three layers, you probably shouldn’t even think about popping your piece out of its mold for 3 or 4 days after the final pour.

Where do you get resin?


Where I get almost everything, Amazon!:XD: I have yet to find reasonably priced resins from art suppliers, so I have been and will continue purchasing my resins from Amazon. EasyCast is the most reliable brand I’ve used, no yellowing, good cure time, and low odor (in fact it really doesn’t smell at all). Around $70 will get you 1 gallon of resin. When purchasing, remember that you are buying two parts, so a 16-ounce kit equals 8 ounces of resin and 8 ounces of hardener.

Practice makes perfect!


I played around with resins for about 5 months before I actually began using them in my paintings and had maaaaaany errors in that time. Like any art process, it’s important to remember that failure is part of learning and mastering the skill. With time, you’ll have success and a beautiful finished artwork :D

:heart:Xadrea

Resin Casting
Ever got the hankering to experiment with resin? Check out this journal for the rundown!
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Consider this journal your watercolor primer! Listed in the sections below are the materials that will help you get well on your way with watercolor! I've included links to my watercolor tutorial series and other helpful watercolor tutorials around dA,  as well as some "assignments" if you would like some ideas to get you started :D

Additives, Pigments, Brushes, & Materials Shopping List

Screenshot 2015-04-25 21.45.43 by Xadrea

    1.     Table Salt. You can get some really interesting textures from using salt in your wet watercolor. The resulting texture can be altered by the size of the salt crystals. Table salt will most often give you very stippled texture, and sea salt will have a softer result. However, table salt can do both depending on the amount of water and salt you use, so it is a cheap staple to keep in your tackle box.

    2.     Rubber Cement. This is not the official masking fluid of watercolor (which is called Frisket), but it is a much cheaper alternative that works just the same.

    3.     Gum Arabic. Gum Arabic is an ingredient in watercolor pigments. If it is used as an additive, it will make your paint dry very shiny and slightly more opaque. 

    4.     Rubbing Alcohol. Also known as Isopropyl Alcohol, can be used to create unique textures. Water-based wet media (ink, watercolor, and acrylic) repels alcohol because their molecules cannot fully mix (similar reactions occur in oil and water).  This affect works best with Isopropyl Alcohol that is 91% or higher alcohol by volume. 

My Watercolor Tools by KelliRoos

Pigments
Royal & Langnickle, M. Graham, Reeves, or Windsor & Newton are suitable (and affordable) brands of tube and cake watercolors. Do not purchase white or black watercolor.  Also, only purchase one tube of each color. The tubes will appear small, but what is inside will last you for years to come. Below is a list of the minimum number of pigments you could get started with:

    ·       Cadmium Red
    ·       Alizarin Crimson
    ·       Burnt Sienna
    ·       Payne’s Gray
    ·       Ultramarine Blue
    ·       Phthalo Blue
    ·       Cadmium Yellow
    ·       Lemon Yellow
    ·       Yellow Ocre

Brushes

There is be no need to purchase expensive, or “fancy” brushes or brush sets for the purpose of watercolor (though such things do exist). Your most expensive brushes will be the wide 1 and 2 in flats, all others can be simple “all media” or acrylic synthetic bristle brushes. Please refer to the list below when purchasing brush sets:

    ·       1 inch flat brush (one)
    ·       2 inch flat brush (one)
    ·       ½ inch flat brush (one)
    ·       ¾ inch flat brush (one)
    ·       Angled flat of any size
    ·       Round brushes, sizes 0-10 (one of each)

Additional Materials

    ·       Two containers with lids for water (NO GLASS JARS)
    ·       Spray bottle
    ·       HB pencil and sharpener
    ·       Paper towels (these can be reused)
    ·       X-acto knife and cutting surface (self healing mat
    ·       Scissors
    ·       Metal ruler (12” or longer)
    ·       Crayons or candles
    ·       Plastic eraser
    ·       Synthetic sponge cut into chunks
    ·       Watercolor 10-24 pan palette that includes a lid
    ·       Gel medium, Mod Podge, or PVC glue
    ·       Masking tape (NOT PAINTER’S TAPE)
    ·       30 in x 40 in Masonite board
    ·       Binder clips
    ·       Binder or folder
    ·       Drinking straws
    ·       Viewfinder
    ·       Shish-kabob skewers
    ·       Q-tips

Papers

Screenshot 2015-04-25 21.57.51 by Xadrea

 The paper used in watercolor work is highly important. It’s very different than other artist’s paper because it is specifically made to get wet. There are three (3) types of paper when it comes to watercolor paper: Hot Pressed, Cold Pressed, and Rough. These papers can be both machine and hand made. Bear in mind, machine made papers will often times have an artificial texture “stamped” into the surface. Hand made papers are generally more expensive. Watercolor papers contain more sizing (that is the stuff that holds the paper pulp together) than regular papers and is much more dense than regular drawing papers. Stretching the paper (that is, saturating it while it is taped to a board and allowing it to dry overnight) may be necessary to avoid buckling if you do not want to tape your paper down. 

In addition to the paper types of, there are also different weights (thickness): 90lb, 140lb, 260lb, and 300lb. These weights are not indicative of the actual weight of the sheets, but instead the weight of the paper ream. A higher weight means a thicker paper. Heavier weight papers are useful to beginners because they are more forgiving in surface and require little or no stretching.

    1.      Hot Pressed Paper. This watercolor paper is very smooth and has almost no tooth (raised texture) to its surface. Since this paper has a very smooth surface it’s ideal for very tight intricate work or illustration. Pigment will also dry more quickly.

    2.      Cold Pressed Paper. This is the most common type you will find in art and craft supply stores. The surface is lightly textured and paint dries with subtle irregularities (watermarking affects).

    3.      Rough Pressed Paper. This watercolor paper is the most heavily textured of the three.  You can achieve the most watermarking effects from the watercolor alone because it will catch and pool in the indentations of the paper’s surface. 

Do not use regular drawing papers to paint on. You will get untold amounts of rippling and buckling in your paper for the afore mentioned reasons. Faber-Castell, Fabriano, Strathmore, and Canson watercolor papers are trustworthy and affordable brands to purchase. Printmaking papers (which are similar to watercolor papers) such as American Masters, Stonehenge, and Reeves BFK can also be used.

1 Month of Watercolor Assignments

Screenshot 2015-04-25 22.42.07 by Xadrea
#1 Swatch Chart:
Learning how to achieve a wide range of tonal variations in watercolor is essential. For this assignment you will be creating a swatch chart of at least three columns in six variations of color on a sheet of watercolor paper. Columns should be taped off to create clean edges. The color family may be of your own choosing or full spectrum.

Screenshot 2015-04-25 22.42.14 by Xadrea
#2 Two-Color Flat Wash Still Life: 
The flat wash is one of the basic techniques of watercolor painting. For this assignment you will create a still life of 4 dissimilarly colored objects in a shoebox. You will be rendering objects using only a single layer of flat washes. 
Screenshot 2015-04-25 22.42.21 by Xadrea
#3 Patterns Using Resists and Brush Control: 
Areas of white space (or negative space) can be achieved through masking and brush control. For this assignment you will create a pattern of your own choosing.

Screenshot 2015-04-25 22.42.27 by Xadrea
#4 Full Color Still Life with Texture Ground:
Beginning with a texture ground of your choice, you will in this assignment create a still life of 5 dissimilarly colored objects in a shoebox.  

Tutorials

Watercolor Tutorial: Wet on Dry by Xadrea Watercolor Tutorial Series: Masking by Xadrea Watercolor Tutorial: How to Mix Watercolor by Xadrea Watercolor Tutorial: Salt Glaze by Xadrea Watercolor Tutorial: Skin by Xadrea Watercolor Tutorial Series: Bleeding by Xadrea Watercolor Tutorial: Hair part 1 by Xadrea Watercolor Tutorial: Hair part 2 by Xadrea Watercolor Tutorial Series: Lifting by Xadrea Art Tutorial: Watercolors Prt1 by Xadrea Art Tutorial: Watercolors Prt2 by Xadrea Watercolor Stretching Tutorial by blix-it Watercolor Tutorial by Loonaki Watercolor Tutorial by Claparo-Sans Watercolor Stretching Tutorial by MisttheWarrior  Watercolor Masking Tutorial by Lithe-Fider Watercolor Effects by CyprinusFox Practical Colors Tutorial by KelliRoos Watercolor Tutorial by Taiyo85

Extra Reading Material




Limber Up Your Imagination
www.watercolorlearningcenter.c…

Watercolor Lessons and Exercises
www.watercolorlearningcenter.c…

Watercolor Tips & Techniques

www.watercolorlearningcenter.c…

Use Your Computer to Paint Better Watercolors
www.watercolorlearningcenter.c…

:heart:Xadrea

Watercolor Patients, Eat Your Heart Out!
If you're a newbie to the watercolor game this journal is for you!:heart:
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Share the word about my book :D +news

Journal Entry: Sat Apr 11, 2015, 10:50 AM
So remember a couple months ago when I told you the book I illustrated went live? Well now I need you all to do me a favor and help me share the word :D Here is the link to buy: www.createspace.com/5284571&nb…;
Just $7.49 a hard copy :D
and below is one of the lurvley pictures within: 
Stormy Horizons by Xadrea

Now for the news: I've decided to totally revamp/revive Queenie aaaaand I've decided to write and illustrate my own children's book *confetti* It's going to be a huge project on both ends since Queenie is well over 100 pages in already, and the fact I'll be doing this book from complete scratch, BUT I have faith in my abilities and perserverance :D Currently, I'm working on some concept sketches for the book characters and reviewing Queenie's text (it will be greatly improved in Queenie 2.0) as well as drawing up a calendar for myself. Currently, I'm just a few weeks away from graduation with my Master's but I have no hard plans for work as of yet. I'm sending out numerous applications weekly with my fingers crossed. I've applied just about all over the place (continental US) so I have no idea if or when I'll have to move either. For now, I have summer work (not great pay, but it's something XD) but doing these projects will help me maintain my sanity and also fulfill the desire to continue making. As always, I appreciate the support and luv from everyone here :D:heart:

  • Mood: Artistic
  • Listening to: The Kids Aren't Alright--Fall Out Boy
  • Reading: Call the Midwife (Part 1): by Jennifer Worth
  • Watching: you!!!
  • Playing: Runescape 3
  • Eating: pretzels
  • Drinking: water
Face5 by Xadrea
Face5
My thesis artwork is almost complete *laughs maniacally*:evillaugh: This set of 8x8" paintings was created through a process of layering resin, screenprinting, and various glues over a watercolor background. They are each about 1/2" thick from three separate resin pours
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Face4 by Xadrea
Face4
My thesis artwork is almost complete *laughs maniacally*:evillaugh: This set of 8x8" paintings was created through a process of layering resin, screenprinting, and various glues over a watercolor background. They are each about 1/2" thick from three separate resin pours
Loading...

deviantID

Xadrea
Mellissa Redman
Artist | Professional | Traditional Art
United States
Hi I'm Mellissa and I'm 26. I graduated cum laude from the University of Akron with a BFA in painting/drawing and a minor in art history in May 2012=D I'm currently working on my MFA in painting at the Kendall College of Art and Design of Ferris State University. I'm an illustrator and freelance artist ^ ^My favorite color is pink, and I think muffins are the cutest food ever!

Besides painting, I love printmaking and I plan on eventually owning a silkscreen to produce prints outside of the studio!
Lastly, I block trolls and overall mean people, so be warned! ;)


Commissions - Open by SweetDukeGifts - Friends Only by SweetDukeRequests - Friends Only by SweetDukeNo Point Commissions by SweetDukeNo Trades by SweetDukeNo Requests by SweetDuke

Current Age: 23
Current Residence: Akron, OH
deviantWEAR sizing preference: small

I'm member of:

:icongetwatchers:

#GetWatchers help artists to share their creativity, increase their audience and get more feedback by getting more exposure and pageviews. If you want more exposure of your arts, constructive critics, watchers and/or if you would like to discover new talented artists, come join us :pointr: Here :pointl:.
Interests

Resin Casting

Thu Apr 30, 2015, 3:00 PM by Xadrea:iconxadrea:
:iconprojecteducate:
:iconprojecteducate:


Artist's Toolbox Week

Using resin in your artwork


Hey guys! I’ve been wanting to write a tutorial on resin casting/pouring for a bit now (and I promise one is in the works!), but in the meanwhile, I think it would be good to explain what epoxy resin is, safety concerns, and of course, how AWESOME it is!

I started using epoxy resin in my paintings almost two years ago after being introduced to the resin paintings of Bruce Riley during ArtPrize 2013. I was initially drawn to finding a way to achieve visual depth on a 2 dimensional surface. Now, of course it is more than possible to depict spatial depth by using perspective, but my paintings aren’t trying to depict a realistic sense of perspective. Rather, I wanted to find a way to layer color and patterns in a shallow space and doing so without overwhelming the image. The only way to achieve that would to be somehow work in multiple layers, and thus resin was the answer! Most recently, I’ve started casting bracelets with my left over resin and I plan on casting even more stuffs as time goes on!

What is this stuff?


So, what is this epoxy resin that I speak of? Epoxy resins are a pre-polymer, which is science for “mixed with the right stuff, this thing’s molecules will link up and get larger and denser.” And that means harder. Most commercial resins are a two-part mix, one part being the resin; the other part is the hardener. The resin requires the hardener in order to harden up. It can be used to protect surfaces, as a glue, or even to cast objects in molds. 2015-02-06 16.17.08 by Xadrea

Is it toxic?


Is it dangerous? Yes and no. While resin isn’t toxic, you can’t bathe in it, eat it, or huff it :XD: In it’s liquid state resin can irritate your skin and give off smelly odors. In it’s hardened state it’s no longer hazardous, unless you decide you’d like to sand/file it because you’d be getting plastic dust in the air (and potentially in your lungs).  There, there, I’m not trying to scare you so get out from under your desk! I’m just giving you the rundown! In my opinion, working with resin in your artwork is no more dangerous than working with oil paint (some of which are toxic).  All art making materials can be dangerous in the right situation, so it’s important to know how to handle them to avoid accidents and health issues down the road.

How do you use it?


I’m pretty good at eyeballing my measurements of the two-part mix, but if you’re just starting off it would be in your best interest to use mini measuring cups. If you don’t measure both parts equally your resin will never fully harden, rather it will stay tacky and unusable. You’ll also need a well-ventilated work area and a level surface. Resin cures in warm environments best, so working in a drafty studio or your garage on a cold day isn’t optimal. I use a silicone mat to protect my table from any drips that might happen, but old paper can do the trick as well. Protect your workstation because resin is permanent. Ok, well that’s not entirely true…it can be melted with other chemicals, but trust me, you don’t want to have to do that. Lastly, if you have a heat gun or blow dryer, bring it along! Both can help you get air bubbles out after you pour it onto whatever surface or mold you’re working with.
2015-02-06 16.16.24 by Xadrea


After you combine the two equal parts of resin, mix them until the liquid is smooth looking. Try to do so smoothly so you don’t get a ton of bubbles. Large ones will pop on their own but the teeny ones will try to stick around and you probably don’t want them. Pay attention to the time. Typically, you’ve got a 30 minute working time before the resin begins to stiffen up, but if your workspace is toasty that time frame will shrink faster. Try to spend no more than 10 minutes mixing. Before you pour your resin, make certain that your surface is oil free, hair free, and level. Since I pour my resin on a surface with no raised edges, I use masking tape to give it a border to run up to. I didn’t do this in the past and I had resin dripping and running everywhere! After I’ve poured my resin, I like to spread it evenly with a painting knife or wooden stirring stick to ensure equal coverage.

What is Cure time?


The cure time for your resin greatly depends on the brand you buy. I’ve found with the kinds I buy 36 hours is the general cure time. If you’re planning on making jewelry (like the bracelets I’ve been making) you’ll really need to pay attention to the cure time because you will be pouring the resin in layers. If you do three layers, you probably shouldn’t even think about popping your piece out of its mold for 3 or 4 days after the final pour.

Where do you get resin?


Where I get almost everything, Amazon!:XD: I have yet to find reasonably priced resins from art suppliers, so I have been and will continue purchasing my resins from Amazon. EasyCast is the most reliable brand I’ve used, no yellowing, good cure time, and low odor (in fact it really doesn’t smell at all). Around $70 will get you 1 gallon of resin. When purchasing, remember that you are buying two parts, so a 16-ounce kit equals 8 ounces of resin and 8 ounces of hardener.

Practice makes perfect!


I played around with resins for about 5 months before I actually began using them in my paintings and had maaaaaany errors in that time. Like any art process, it’s important to remember that failure is part of learning and mastering the skill. With time, you’ll have success and a beautiful finished artwork :D

:heart:Xadrea

Are you on Twitter? follow me @XadreaLeonhart :D 

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6 deviants said Yes follow me! put your handle in the comments section

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:iconlexi247:
Lexi247 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
Just stopping by to say hello :hug: Have a wonderful day!
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
:hug: thankies!
Reply
:iconmrwolfeconcoctions:
MrWolfeConcoctions Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2015  Professional General Artist
Flashy sent me here. :)
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
:heart::wave::hug:
Reply
:iconnamco-nintendofan-88:
Namco-NintendoFan-88 Featured By Owner Edited Feb 28, 2015  Student Traditional Artist
HAPPY 26th BIRTHDAY, Mellissa Redman, a.k.a. "Xadrea," dear friend!
:sing: :sing: :sing: :sing: :dance: :dance: :boogie: :boogie: :party: :airborne:

Good luck, and I hope you'll have a great birthday today!
Also wishing you keep up the good work on all awesome artwork 'n stuff; I love 'em! ;) :heart:
:thumbsup: :pringles: :cake: :pie:

Comments by:
Nelson C. [my real name],
"N.N.F.88"
3:00 P.M.
Los Angeles, CA ;)

Since I wouldn't have been able to do some birthday muro drawings, I got two extra drawing copies, so...
SURPRISE;
Believe it or not, two birthday muro drawing copies I made, of chibi Haruhi Suzumiya and Mikuru Asahina wishing you one, so, wishes 'n' luck!
Click on them:
fc06.deviantart.net/fs70/f/201…
fc02.deviantart.net/fs70/z/201…
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
:heart: Thank you! :meow:
Reply
:iconajinu-okami:
AJInu-Okami Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2015  Student Digital Artist
Happy birthday!
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
:hug: thank you!
Reply
:iconajinu-okami:
AJInu-Okami Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2015  Student Digital Artist
You're welcome :)
Reply
:iconbirthdays:
birthdays Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2015
:woohoo: :party: :iconcakelickplz: !!! HAPPY BIRTHDAY !!! :iconcakelickplz: :party: :woohoo:

It's February 28th which means it's that time of the year again and your special day is here! We hope you have an awesome day with lots of birthday fun, gifts, happiness and most definitely, lots of cake! Here's to another year!

Many well wishes and love from your friendly birthdays team :love:

---
Birthdays Team
This birthday greeting was brought to you by: KoudelkaW
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
:dance: thank you!
Reply
:iconsimplecomics:
simpleCOMICS Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2015  Student Digital Artist
I've recently hurt a very dear friend by forgetting their birthday. I shall not do the same to you, Ms. X ^^

Happy Birthday! I hope things are going well for you these days :party:
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
:heart: Aww thank you Jason ^ ^ things are going pretty well, busy with school as usual buuuuut spring break is next week so I hope to be around dA most of that week :D
Reply
:iconsimplecomics:
simpleCOMICS Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2015  Student Digital Artist
Sounds like a plan. :)
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
Woohoo, plan in action :D
Reply
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