Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
December 20, 2013
Image Size
457 KB
Resolution
720×4832
Submitted with
Sta.sh
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
1,815 (1 today)
Favourites
163 (who?)
Comments
13
Downloads
37
×
Color Tutorial Series: Basic Terminology by Xadrea Color Tutorial Series: Basic Terminology by Xadrea
Based upon a lot of recent confusion I've noticed surrounding color theory (and understanding how to apply it) I'm making a series of tutorials about color theory, color mixing, color families, and color schemes. Familiarizing yourself with color theory will benefit how you handle color in your work and help sophisticate your palette. This particular tutorial contains textbook definitions of terms you should become familiar with, as well as a visual of the color wheel and examples of compliment combinations. The next tutorial will be on color families. 
Color Tutorial Series: Color Families and Schemes by Xadrea
Add a Comment:
 
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Jan 3, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
wonderful :hug:
Reply
:iconchronophontes:
Chronophontes Dec 26, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Nice!  One qualification though.  I once tried mixing red and blue to get purple, and got instead a very nice shade of brown.  Later, when I started working in the printing industry, I learned about cyan, magenta and yellow, and found that they really work.  Nowadays unfortunately I don't do much painting any more, but when I do, I use those three.  (Along with black and white, of course.)
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Dec 26, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
The saturation of the original red and blue you were mixing counts as well. Scarlet or vermillion mixed with any variant of blue will almost always produce a cool toned neutral. The CMYK color palette is very useful, but for beginners it can be hard to grasp :D (outside printing and printmaking that is)
Reply
:iconchronophontes:
Chronophontes Dec 26, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
True - my first try was with vermilion and prussian blue.  My second try, with alizarin and ultramarine, was closer - it was a distinctly purplish brown.

I teach multimedia, which is all done on the computer and where RGB (and hence CMY for printing) are unavoidable.   Furthermore, color printers always use CMYK, so anyone who buys printer cartridges is going to run into the issue.  So I like to tell my students "Your art teacher lied to you."

Irrelevant note: in my printing job, I learned why the "K" in CMYK.  It stands for "Key" - because in doing four-color printing, the black plate is the key plate that the cyan, magenta and yellow plates are supposed to line up with.  If they don't line up, it looks awful - you've probably seen examples of that happening.
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Dec 26, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
You'll get the best violet with ultramarine and cadmium red, but cerulean also produces a nice violet (just not as strong because there's white in cerulean)And yep! I do a lot of printmaking and some cmyk printing and I agree, registration has to be spot on, but ESPECIALLY with the key (whatever color the key image). 
Reply
:iconlord-darcy:
A good intro to the basics of color theory. Well done.
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Dec 24, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you for your kind words! :hug: 
Reply
:iconlord-darcy:
You're welcome. :iconhugcouponplz:
Reply
:iconroseroselli:
Very helpful ! Thanks !

Reply
Add a Comment: